Friday, February 17, 2006

The Kissy Bits #10 - Writing About Real People

The Kissy Bits #10 - Writing About Real People

Legal issues in writing
How to keep it real: Do your research.
What about your friends and family?
How to deal with helpful story offers

What do you want to hear about on the Kissy Bits? Let me know!

Listen to the show

3 Comments:

At 1:16 pm, Blogger JRMurdock said...

Still no luck Kiki? :(

If you can e-mail me the show, I can put it up on my server for the time being until you get the issue worked out with your server....

 
At 5:53 am, Anonymous Tim King said...

Hi, Kiki. Great points on creating characters and using them to turn fantasy into reality! I was nodding my head all the way.

We shouldn't be afraid to use real experiences of real people in our stories. But think about multiple real people, then base the character on your own ideas. That way, if someone thinks a character is based on a particular friend of yours, you can honestly say that the character is based on no real person, even if on a few particular points, the character was inspired by real people.

-TimK

 
At 9:16 am, Anonymous Amanda said...

Hi Kiki! Just wanted to let you know that both episode 10 and 3 are now coming in loud and clear, so whatever you did, it worked. =) Thanks.

Apologies for a slow reply! I listened to episode 10 several days ago, but I got so wrapped up in my own business I totally forgot to give you any feedback. I feel so bad. But I'm here now, and I've given my response plenty of thought while I was carefully avoiding the Kissy Bits blog! *grin* Anyway, what I really want from the podcast is to explore how to write good romance scenes in your book. You've done a spectacular job describing some of the different elements that go into a romantic novel, as well as talking about what actually classifies as a romance, and I've enjoyed that. But I'm a complete newb to the romance novel scene, and I would like to have some romantic elements in my book which falls under the dreaded "speculative fiction" category. Unfortunately I feel nervous about writing romantic scenes between my characters because I don't know how to make them seem not cheesy. I want them to seem realistic, and to really draw the reader in and give them a clear sense that these two characters are attracted to one another, or in love, or whatever the situation calls for. I'd love to hear your thoughts on writing romantic scenes in a book and maybe giving examples of how to make your love scenes not-horrible?

I'd also like to hear more from your co-host. I really think you should let her talk more, and letting her meow and crash into things in the background just isn't the same thing. You're being such a mic hog, Kiki!!

- A

(P.S. Tongue firmly in cheek for that last bit. *wink*)

 

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